Posts Tagged ‘weeds’

Public Service Garden

We consider our garden to be a public service at this point.  Folks can take one look at our horrible weed patch, and feel better about their own garden:

On the bright side, there are still plenty of veggies under all that, and when we actually pull the weeds off any given row, we are shocked to find how well things are doing!



A couple days ago, we picked three shopping bags of green beans, after weeding that part – enough to put over 40 cups of chopped beans in the freezer.  They were doing great under all those weeds.  The sunflowers have outgrown the weeds, now, and they are doing well, too…we might just start calling it living mulch…



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The Good:

There were some peas in the garden at just the perfect stage of ripeness.  Not enough for much more than snacking…yet…but boy, were they tasty.  I went out to supervise Hubby weeding – you know, keep him company for awhile, and ooh and aah over the progress he had made, which was pretty significant.  Overall this summer, the weeds have been winning most of the time, but when we bushwack our way back down to dirt in any given row, we keep discovering that the vegetables are still there, and doing fine.  After getting through the weeds, Hubby thinned the beets, and the bundle of greens was big enough to be a side dish for a meal.  While we were at it, we dug up a couple of potato plants, just to see what was under there, and were pleased to find big healthy potatoes, ready to be cooked up into lunch.  I pulled up a couple of immature onions, and went inside to make something to eat…

Recipe:  Creamy Dilled Potatoes

12 small potatoes (or 3 or 4 big ones), cut into bite-sized chunks

2 immature garden onions (or 1/2 of a regular white onion, or a good handful of green onions)

a little butter

1/2 cup heavy cream

1/2 cup milk

1 tsp dried dill

salt and pepper to taste

Boil the potatoes in a little salted water water until tender.  While the potatoes are cooking, chop the white part of the onion and fry in butter until just translucent.  Chop the green part of the onion and add that, too, once the white is mostly cooked.   add the milk and heavy cream (or just add a cup of light cream – we happened to have heavy cream around, about to go off, and I did not want to waste it), and the dill, salt, and pepper.  When to potatoes are done cooking, drain the water, then put them back in the pot and add the cream sauce.  Simmer briefly and serve.  We had ours with steamed beet greens with a bit of butter and lemon.  This is very rich, and would probably be best as a side dish with a lighter meal like grilled chicken and steamed veg, but we liked it just fine as the main course, too!

The Bad:

Last weekend, Hubby found one of the chickens in the coop, laying on her side.  She was not in any distress, but seemed to be unable to get up.  We put her in a box with a bit of straw for bedding, and brought her into the porch.  She ate and drank happily enough, and seemed fine, except for an inability to stand.  After five days, she was no better at all, and seemed weaker and in some discomfort from laying on her side all the time – some of her feathers were getting loose, and she just did not look well at all.

I told Hubby that I would not participate in anything that involved blood until after my morning coffee, so he sharpened the axe and took the chicken out to the woods at 7am and dealt with it by himself.  She has joined the chicks in the little cemetery in the woods, as we don’t know what sort of bug made her paralyzed like that, and didn’t really want to eat sick chicken.   Hubby said the experience was “gruesome”, but he thinks slaughter time will go fine.  I am proud of him – he has never killed anything bigger than a mosquito before, but he was able to do the humane thing, and made a clean kill.

The Dessert:

Last week, I was experimenting with making candied peel, and tried making candied ginger while I was at it.  A few years ago, Mom had this lovely box of chocolates that had candied ginger in the centres, and taste-testing my home-made candied ginger reminded me of that for some reason.  I had a chunk of Bernard Callebeaut dark chocolate in the pantry, bought for some long-forgotten recipe that I failed to get around to, so I broke out the candy molds and the double boiler.  I made half with the candied ginger, but Hubby is not a big ginger guy, so at his request, I filled the other half with dollops of saskatoon berry jam that I made earlier this week.  Both types were fantastic, but they look exactly the same, so we have to be careful which end of the mold each chocolate comes from, lest Hubby get a nasty surprise!

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We started planting back before the May Long Weekend (May 23rd), and had started seeds much earlier than that, but our garden did not get off to an auspicious start.  While the May Long boasted gorgeous weather, the following week, and two weeks after, brought killing frosts, and temperatures several degrees below freezing.  Some areas got quite a bit of snow in mid-June, be we had no moisture at all, and only the onion sets and potatoes came up for the longest time.


Then it started to rain.  And rain.  And rain.  We began to wonder if we should build an Ark.  The barn sprang a leak right over the Chicken Mahal, and we could not keep up with emptying the buckets.  It rained some more.  The barn cats would not come out of the barn.  It became a challenge to get to work, as sloughs started filling up and threatening to spill over the roads.  The frogs loved it, at least.


There have been a couple of sunny days, but not enough to actually dry anything out – just enough to encourage the mosquito population to dramatic new highs.  The sunny days have been hot and muggy, punctuated by thunderstorms that roll in and knock the power out for an hour or two, terrify the dogs, and move on after dumping a couple more inches of rain.   I thought Saskatchewan was supposed to be an arid province, but I digress.


Today, after a couple of back-to-back days of sun, we finally got out into the garden to take a look around.  I’m sure it’s been almost two weeks since we were last able to even walk in there.


The potatoes are knee high, and the onions are up and looking great.  There are slightly-crooked rows of beans, beets, carrots, radishes, and turnips, all with their baby leaves pushed up through the dirt.  The peas have several leaves each, though the plants are a little smaller than I somehow think they ought to be.  The squash, melon, pepper, and tomato transplants look unhappy with all the mud, but seem to be hanging in there.  No asparagus, though, not one single plant out of fifty, and one of the rhubarb plants is definitely dead.  The corn is not up yet, and I wonder if the seed has rotted.   Hubby may have to re-plant, and hope we still have enough time for it to set any ears.   The sunflowers are…completely overgrown with thistles, lamb’s quarters, and canola.


In fact, the most impressive growth of anything in the garden at all, is the weeds.   We have a very lush field of them, 85 by 95 feet, plus another 15 or 20 feet around the edges of the garden where our very kind farmer neighbours were especially careful to not spray the garden with Roundup, or whatever herbicide they are using on the canola they have planted all around our acreage.  We’re going to have to take a lawnmower through there, just to find the garden!


Hubby has his work cut out for him, and there’s more rain forecast for tomorrow…

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