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Posts Tagged ‘weather’

The weather has been odd, at best, this year.  Spring was very late for us; we still had snow on the north sides of the hedges on Victoria Day, which is the third weekend in May.  Then we had a couple weeks where it was hot and dry, then it decided to rain…and rain…and rain…

 

A week ago Friday, we got three inches of rain in a few hours.  Our normal annual precipitation is 12 to 14 inches.  Of course, there hasn’t been a normal year since we moved here in 2011; it’s been one wet year after another.  It’s gotten to the point that the roads are so soggy that they dissolve under any sort of heavy traffic, like, for instance, tractors out doing seeding, and car-swallowing potholes appear more or less overnight.  As well, with the ground saturated to begin with, the roadside sloughs creep a little higher with every rain, until the roads are underwater, or just wash away entirely.  Of the five routes i could normally choose from to get to work, we’re down to one, and there is a slough within a few inches of wiping that road out, as well.  If it came to it, I could take a ferry to the other side of the river, but that would add an hour or so to my commute.

 

Today, the rain finally stopped for a bit, and some of the roads started drying out.  We took a peek in the garden, and it’s…bad.  Really bad.  Like chest-high thistles bad.  On the bright side, from our vantage point, we could see potatoes, onions, lots of beans and sunflowers, some squash plants, and some corn, so at least the rain did not rot all the seed. We couldn’t see the carrots, spinach, or beets, but I don’t know if that was because they haven’t sprouted, or if they’re just obscured by weeds.   Now, we just have to go in there and find our vegetable rows in all that weedy mess…

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We really enjoy our chickens.  Roasted, barbequed, or in soups…and sometimes their personalities are cute, too.

 

Two years ago, we ordered fifty chickens, without quite knowing where we would put them.  We built a coop in one corner of the barn, but we discovered (the day we brought those chicks home) that it was drafty when it was six degrees outside and raining sideways.  So, we ended up with fifty chicks taking up residence in our bathtub for a week or so, until we could make alternate arrangements.

 

2013 chicks

 

This year, we ordered 25 more chicks, to replace the hens that the fox got last summer, and also with the intent of boosting our egg production, as we’ve found it astonishingly easy to unload eggs, even at a slightly profitable price.  There are other folks around here selling eggs for less than we charge, but we have an advantage:  one of our ‘bonus’ chickens that the hatchery included in our order lays green eggs.  Apparently a green egg or two is worth at least a dollar a dozen!

 

2013 Americauna chick

 

With that in mind, we ordered ten straight run Americaunas, the breed that lays the green eggs.  Apparently they can also lay blue, brown, and pink eggs, depending, so I’m hoping that we get at least five hens, and that at least a couple of them lay colored eggs.

 

 

2013 Americauna chick

 

We also got 15 Black Sex Link hen chicks.  We’ve never had them before, but I really liked the idea of minimizing the number of new roosters around here.  We still have plenty from the 25 or so we butchered in 2011; apparently we don’t eat chicken as often as I thought.  These BSL girls are supposed to be good layers, and very hardy in cold weather.  Hopefully this is true, as our winters are very long and cold.

 

 

2013 Black Sex Link chick

 

Knowing we had chickens coming, we had a plan, and even a place to put them.  The weather had been quite nice for several weeks, and there is a reasonably protected corner of the barn we thought we could reclaim; the coop we built for the 2011 chicks is, of course, occupied by the 2011 chickens, so that wasn’t an option.   Then, of course (of course!), it got chilly, and the rain came.  Great for my garden; not so great for day-old chicks.   At least this time we didn’t have to scramble to put a hook in over the bathtub to hang the heat lamp on…

 

 

2013 Americauna chick

 

Those chicks will be evicted as soon as the weather turns, though…

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I got sent home from work today, due to road conditions.  I walked out of the office, and smelled the pines and poplars – it smelled like spring.  Most likely because it was pouring rain and +2.  In northern Saskatchewan, in January.  We’re at least 15 degrees warmer than normal, maybe 20.  I’m afraid that if this weather keeps up, my fruit trees will start to break dormancy – it happens in Calgary all the time during chinooks, and kills a lot of trees, especially young ones.

 

One of the things I was looking forward to in moving back to Saskatchewan was predictable winter weather.  It’s supposed to get cold around Halloween, and stay cold until sometime just before Easter.  No melty weather or horrible icy roads.  No chinooks, and no midwinter warm spells.  Just nice cold weather that you can acclimatize to, with nice fluffy snow (no ice layer) that you can ski on.  So much for that thought.

 

I told Hubby that if next winter does this too, we’re going to start buying trees a couple zones warmer than our theoretical zone, because if we can get them to survive, we could potentially be growing peaches and sweet cherries (zone 5 trees) down at the farm (currently considered a zone 3 area) in 5 or 10 years when global warming really picks up.  If I can’t have proper winter, I might as well at least have tasty fruit…

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Well, it’s truly autumn now, and the leaves are turning and falling all at once.  The garden is mostly put to bed, and we’re starting to pick up lawn furniture and garden tools to put away for the winter – snow could come in a matter of weeks, and it always seems to be a surprise.  Little projects are being finished in anticipation of winter.  Autumn leaves never seem to last long, here – they turn, then the winds come and they’re gone.  Yesterday, I went out and took some pictures before we lose the pretty gold accents around the Acreage…

 

 

 

 

We think we may have finally found a suitable truck, though it needs a bit of brake work before we can bring it home.  A good friend has promised to do it for us, hopefully in the next couple of weeks, so we hope to be able to get the materials to finally finish the buck yard…with luck, before it snows.  We still need to evict the badger, however.

 

We got a puppy.  She was kind of an accident.  We won’t go into details, but here’s a picture:

 

 

Pretty cute, huh?  We are calling her Poppy.

 

We have a couple of little boys coming to stay with us next week, which should keep Poppy plenty busy.  She really likes people and attention, and I am expecting she will get plenty.  I’m sure they will keep us plenty busy, too!  Still, the country is a good place for little boys, I think, and we’ll give their caregivers a bit of a break.  Of course, there is more story here, but it will have to wait for another day.

 

Autumn feels like a good time for changes…

 

 

 

 

 

 

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…as in the weather has been hot.  Damn hot.  And surprisingly humid, for a part of the world that normally sees around 16 inches of precipitation…annually.   While it is not as hot as, say, Cairo (37), or Seville (38), or even Atlanta (34) or Houston (33), the temperatures have been up there, lately.  Today, our thermometer read 30 degrees for most of the day, and Environment Canada indicated that our humidity was around 50%, adding at least five degrees to the “feels like” temperature.

 

Our house, being of late-50’s vintage, and having never even had the kitchen linoleum updated, let alone the climate control system, has no air conditioning.  I actually don’t mind this too much, since a/c always makes me feel sick, with a scratchy sore throat and a headache.  Even though Hubby’s car has air, we normally just roll down the windows.  We’re such Luddites…

 

Since the heat effectively grounds the mosquitoes, Hubby says he does not mind it at all, and he has been out working in the garden the last couple of days.  This afternoon, I took him out a big ole bottle of homemade iced tea, to help stave off heat exhaustion.  I stayed to supervise the weeding for awhile, and  got myself a bit of a sunburn…unusual, considering the tan I have acquired this year – one of the better ones I have had since I came back from North Africa.  Turns out, one of the latest meds has photosensitivity as a side effect, I (somewhat belatedly) discovered.

 

While I was in North Africa, I made a bunch of discoveries about coping with heat.  I got so good at it that even the locals in Aswan in southern Egypt shook their heads and called me crazy when I set out on a ten kilometer uphill walk on a 45 degree day.  I was fine, I might add, though I drank over 5 liters of water in just under 6 hours.  What I discovered is that salt, sugar, and caffeine are your friends.   The salt replaces what you sweat out…it may sound counter-intuitive, but you need salt in your system to keep your cells hydrated.  The caffeine helps with that droopy feeling you get when you are too warm – it constricts your blood vessels, which tend to relax in the heat and slow your circulation, making you feel sluggish.  The sugar is a quick energy boost when your body is too hot to put much effort into real digestion.  Then, you need water.  Lots and lots of pure water.  Liters of it, consumed a sip here and a swallow there, before you actually feel thirsty, because in real heat, by the time you feel really thirsty, you will have a hard time getting enough water in you to compensate for what you are losing in sweat.

 

Another trick is to hold your hands in cold water up to the wrists, or soak your feet.

 

Having never lived in a house with air conditioning, I have also learned tricks to stay cool enough to sleep.  First and foremost, don’t add to your misery by running the dryer, or cooking on the stove.  Those ones are obvious, but I have also found that running a computer can heat up a room in an awful hurry.  Though we don’t have a TV or video game system or big stereo, I would guess that they would also throw off a significant amount of heat.  Pay attention to what is heating up the room, as this can add five or ten degrees, maybe more, and ten degrees can be the difference between a sweaty night of tossing and turning, and an acceptable snooze.

 

Mom always closed all of the windows and blinds first thing in the morning, then opened everything back up in the evening to catch the cool breezes and cool the house.  We don’t have blinds on most of the windows here, yet, and the sheer curtains in the living room don’t do much to keep out the light or heat, so we take a different tactic.  We keep windows on the cool sides of the house (west and north in the morning, east in the evening) open to catch whatever breeze we can, but cover the windows as best we can (even using blankets) when the sun hits them.  In the hottest part of the day today, the house was substantially cooler inside than out, and not muggy at all.

 

We feed the dogs ice cubes and keep their water dish as cool as possible, as our poor husky is really not built for summer temperatures.  The cats, on the other hand, get all offended that I have blocked off all of their sunbeams.  Go figure.

 

Someday I will build myself a summer kitchen, or at least acquire a barbeque, but in the meantime, meals have been along the lines of ricotta and crackers, or milk-and-frozen-fruit smoothies, or veggies and dip.  Ice cream with canned fruit has been a lunchtime favorite lately, and I have been known to snack on frozen strawberries.  I suppose we could do sandwiches, if we had any luncheon meat, but neither of us has really been interested in sitting down for a ‘proper’ meal.  Tomorrow, when it is cooler (the weatherman is calling for rain), I will make up more ricotta, and do any other cooking that might be necessary, like pasteurizing milk and canning up all of the saskatoon berries Hubby picked for me earlier this week.  You have to plan ahead for this stuff.

 

Come bedtime, if it is still too warm inside, and there is no breeze (like tonight) even with all the windows open and the ceiling fan in the living room going full blast, I make a point of going to bed with wet hair.  Even a brief duck through the shower (or, in my case, a bucket of cool water poured over my head) can cool you down substantially.  I also wipe my arms and face with a damp cloth just before laying down.  If it is really hot, I wet a dish towel, then wring it out until it is just damp, and use that instead of a sheet.  Of course, this only works if the humidity is low (which is usually in in Saskatchewan), but as the water evaporates, it cools the towel (and me), which is sometimes the last little bit of cooling I need to get to sleep…

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There are a bunch of thoughts I have been saving up, nothing big enough for its own post, but ideas I wanted to share.

 

 

Barn Pants:

The barn is…smelly.  In a good way – we clean it pretty regularly, but goats and chickens and cats have…aromas.  Aromas I do not necessarily want to be wearing to work.  Furthermore, chores involve a variety of filth – every morning and evening, we scoop the chicken crap out of the waterers, dole out several kinds of food to the various critters, pet and groom said critters, and milk – my aim is improving, but I still don’t always hit the bucket.  If I were to wear a fresh pair of jeans every day, we would be doing a lot of laundry…and I am pretty sure I’ve made it clear on this blog how we feel about laundry around here.  Therefore, Hubby and I have designated Barn Clothes, that hang in the entryway, ranging from somewhat soiled to totally filthy, and only get washed when it rains and the water is free.  For winter, we will be getting some coveralls, but for summertime, the designated clothing system seems to be working.  Just one more small way to conserve water…

 

 

Emergency Soup:

We have had a lot of storms here, lately, causing several power outages.  No power here means no water (cistern pump is electric) no sewer (ditto the septic pump-out), no lights (for obvious reasons), and no stove (until I get a wood stove, that is).   We have back-up plans for dealing with these things – we keep a couple of jugs of water on hand, for instance, and I have my trusty kerosene lamps.  Back up plans or no, though, these power outages are getting darn inconvenient.   The other night, we came in from chores just in time for a huge crash of lightning and thunder to kill the electricity…again.  We were cold, wet, tired, and hungry.   I had planned to make a quick meal of pasta and white sauce, and a cup of tea.   We waited around for half an hour to see if the power would come back on, but it did not.   We wound up snacking on cheese and crackers, but I was quite put out about it.  I really wanted a hot meal, but I could not justify wasting the time and fuel to dig out the camping stove and put a two- or three- pot meal together, and I was too cold and tired to think up anything easier.

 

Last summer, Hubby and I planned to do a long (week – plus) kayaking trip.  We taste-tested a bunch of freeze-dried / dehydrated camping food, but found most of it over-priced and / or inferior.  So, we bought a bunch of freeze dried and dehydrated ingredients, with the intent of creating our own meals for the trip.   I remembered those ingredients the next day (after the power had come back on, of course), and put together a couple of meals in quart jars – freeze dried green beans and celery, dehydrated carrots and onions, parsley, pepper, and minute rice – all we have to do is add some no-MSG bullion (I can’t tolerate MSG), and some boiling water – voila, instant vegetable soup!  I taste-tested a batch, and it was quite nice.  The next time I want a hot meal during a power outage, all I have to be able to do is boil a pot of water – just one pot, and no thinking necessary.  At the rate the power has been flickering here, though, I may need to come up with a couple more recipes, just for variety.  We are at the end of the road, and not a priority for repairs, I suspect, and it has been a bad year for thunderstorms already…

 

 

The Wayward Cat:

Earlier this week, we opened up all of the barn doors, and finally let the three new cats roam free.  We had been putting it off, due to inclement weather, plus various construction projects we were still completing – Stevie is a bit…tightly wound…and we were afraid the pounding and sawing would scare him off.  Sure enough, even without the pounding and sawing, Stevie immediately disappeared, and did not turn up for supper.  Bobby did not want to come back into the barn to be locked up for the night, but at least she put in an appearance.  We really want to keep everyone in the barn at night, as there are so many predators here – owls, foxes, coyotes, and apparently even bears and wolves, though we’ve never seen either here.   Today was about day four with no sign of Stevie, and we were beginning to give up hope.  We were feeling pretty bad about it, as he was a nice cat, even if he was a little sketchy.  Lo and behold, though, at supper chores tonight, who turned up but Stevie, hungry and a little ragged-looking, but otherwise unharmed.  Sighs of relief all around!

 

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We started planting back before the May Long Weekend (May 23rd), and had started seeds much earlier than that, but our garden did not get off to an auspicious start.  While the May Long boasted gorgeous weather, the following week, and two weeks after, brought killing frosts, and temperatures several degrees below freezing.  Some areas got quite a bit of snow in mid-June, be we had no moisture at all, and only the onion sets and potatoes came up for the longest time.

 

Then it started to rain.  And rain.  And rain.  We began to wonder if we should build an Ark.  The barn sprang a leak right over the Chicken Mahal, and we could not keep up with emptying the buckets.  It rained some more.  The barn cats would not come out of the barn.  It became a challenge to get to work, as sloughs started filling up and threatening to spill over the roads.  The frogs loved it, at least.

 

There have been a couple of sunny days, but not enough to actually dry anything out – just enough to encourage the mosquito population to dramatic new highs.  The sunny days have been hot and muggy, punctuated by thunderstorms that roll in and knock the power out for an hour or two, terrify the dogs, and move on after dumping a couple more inches of rain.   I thought Saskatchewan was supposed to be an arid province, but I digress.

 

Today, after a couple of back-to-back days of sun, we finally got out into the garden to take a look around.  I’m sure it’s been almost two weeks since we were last able to even walk in there.

 

The potatoes are knee high, and the onions are up and looking great.  There are slightly-crooked rows of beans, beets, carrots, radishes, and turnips, all with their baby leaves pushed up through the dirt.  The peas have several leaves each, though the plants are a little smaller than I somehow think they ought to be.  The squash, melon, pepper, and tomato transplants look unhappy with all the mud, but seem to be hanging in there.  No asparagus, though, not one single plant out of fifty, and one of the rhubarb plants is definitely dead.  The corn is not up yet, and I wonder if the seed has rotted.   Hubby may have to re-plant, and hope we still have enough time for it to set any ears.   The sunflowers are…completely overgrown with thistles, lamb’s quarters, and canola.

 

In fact, the most impressive growth of anything in the garden at all, is the weeds.   We have a very lush field of them, 85 by 95 feet, plus another 15 or 20 feet around the edges of the garden where our very kind farmer neighbours were especially careful to not spray the garden with Roundup, or whatever herbicide they are using on the canola they have planted all around our acreage.  We’re going to have to take a lawnmower through there, just to find the garden!

 

Hubby has his work cut out for him, and there’s more rain forecast for tomorrow…

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